How often do you get ill?

If you regularly get ill, are always poorly, we can show you how the benefits of regular exercise can dramatically improve your health.

How often do you get ill?, post thumbnail.

A random thought on a lazy weekend

As hubby staggered back into the bedroom this morning snuffling and obviously sporting another summer cold, something struck me. I NEVER GET ILL. I suffer from a bad back and my ever-present knee injury flares up on occasions and sometimes I’m convinced I’m suffering early onset Alzheimer’s, but when was the last time I got a tummy bug? I honestly can’t remember. When was the last time I even had a cold? Guys, I kid you not, it’s YEARS.

Now, I’m not some kind of robot, I’m certainly not super human so what’s the reason for my insanely healthy disposition? You know what? I think it’s because I work out so regularly. Three times a week, every week. And I think regularly must be the secret, because lots of people work out and still get ill. Maybe they just don’t do it regularly enough! Now, I’m not saying that if you come to class three times every week you won’t succumb to any illness ever again. That would be crazy and let’s look at the facts. The lovely Lisa Leigh was laid low by a bug only the other day and she’s surely one of the fittest people I know and works out more than me! No all I’m saying is working out seems to help. I’ve heard many times that exercise boosts immunity and it’s true to say that before I started on my amazing fitness journey, I was as ill as the next person, definitely had a cold two or three times a year and eternal sickness bugs while the children were small. In fact, I can remember Christmases when I was so ill I could hardly get out of bed. That just doesn’t happen anymore, so I’ve been checking out my theory. Here’s what I found.

Consider this…

It’s possible that physical activity flushes bacteria out of your lungs and airways more effectively meaning you’re just not as prone to cold and flu viruses.
It’s possible that exercise causes changes in antibodies and white blood cells. These are the cells that detect disease in the body so it makes absolute sense that if they’re rushing around at speed (as I’m sure they are during one of my workouts), then they’re gonna come into contact with those bugs sooner and more often. This hasn’t been proven of course.
Your temperature rises when you exercise, right? The same way your temperature rises when you have a fever. Now we all know how that works, how the rise in temperature kills the bugs. So, by default, exercise kills them too.

Exercise slows down the release of stress hormones. Some stress increases the chance of illness. Lower stress hormones mean less illness.
So, for once I’m not crazy. it seems there’s something in my theory. I realise I’m not re-inventing the wheel here, but these random kinds of thoughts regularly drift across the vast and uncultivated wilderness that is my brain, and sometimes, just sometimes these thought are worth sharing.[

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